Expertise and experience

CRESS has a dedicated team of staff who are committed to river improvement and restoration. The centre directors, David Gilvear and Nigel Willby are both internationally acclaimed river scientists and are leading experts within their field.

David is a fluvial geomorphologist with an interest in the interaction between physical habitat quality and river ecology. Nigel is a freshwater ecologist who specialises in aquatic plants and biological attributes.

Colin Bull is a fisheries biologist with expertise in the ecology and management of salmonid fisheries, assisted with the development of standard fisheries techniques he has played managerial roles on National fisheries projects. Roser Casas is a forestry engineer with a wide range of experience in rivers having been involved with projects concerning management of riparian woodland, monitoring impacts of hydro-power operations and community engagement in rivers.

 
Resources

CRESS has access to a wide range of resources at the University of Stirling, such as use of:

The combination of resources, staff and experience make CRESS one of the leading interdisciplinary organisations in applied river science and ecological quality assessment.

 
Awards

The Saltires Society Awards for Civil Engineering 2006

The River Nith diversion was nominated for the Saltire Award for Civil Engineering in association with The Institution of Civil Engineers Civil Engineering Award 2006. The University of Stirling was awarded, together with East Ayrshire Council (sponsor), Scottish Coal Ltd (Client and contractor), Halcrow Group Ltd (designer), for the research and monitoring of the re-diversion, with a long term commitment and dissemination of knowledge which will be carry out through a 15 year monitoring programme to measure geomorphic performance and macro-invertebrate recovery which will help inform future river engineering design.

The Environmental Commendation for the River Nith Re-Diversion recognises the way in which innovative design and construction techniques took account of environmental end ecological issues in restoring important salmon spawning beds at the site of a former major open-cast mine.